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Reflections: Selling Sun

Contact Author Katie Anderson
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We are approaching sunnier months, both metaphorically and environmentally. At the time I write this, deaths from the pandemic are decreasing and vaccine numbers are increasing. In addition, we are going to set our clocks forward mid-March. Yes, you are going to lose some sleep, but think about the daylight you’ll gain. Spring arrives at our doorstep a week later and with it will be more time outdoors in the sunshine.

For us in the skin care industry, this automatically means more sun care, but the same can’t be said for our family, friends and clients. About 70% of adults use some type of sun protection on a warm, sunny day, but the same can’t always be said on days when it’s not as warm and sunny. Also, only 10% of teenagers are applying sun protection, and we know it only takes a few sunburns to increase your risk of skin cancer exponentially.

We’ve got our work cut out for us, because we first have to sell the customer on the need for sun care before we ever sell them the sun care product. Luckily, this issue of Skin Inc. helps us do just that.

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On Page 26, Brian Goodwin discusses techniques to sell clients sun care, including: asking specific questions during the consultation, talking about it in the treatment and closing the sale. He provides a specific script of responses he calls a “yes chain” to make sure you close the sale.

When it comes to sun protection, some clients just don’t want to add another product to their lineup. This is where multifunctional products such as BB creams and tinted sunscreens come into play. These products offer sun protection and coverage, with many of them offering additional skin care benefits. To explore some of the myths surrounding tinted sun care such as they clog pores or don’t need to be reapplied, turn to Page 48 for an article by Danné Montague King. He dispells misconceptions and adds that not all ingredients are compatible with sunscreen ingredients, so less is best in this type of product.

Before the weather gets warmer, make sure you have an adequate selection of sun care products in your retail area to offer clientele. If you need a few suggestions from us, turn to Page 53.

With the winter we have had, I think it is safe to say we could all use a ray of sunshine. But to stay safe, we first need to sell it.

Yours in SPF,

Katie Anderson

Editor in Chief

kanderson@allured.com

References

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/behavior/sun-protection.htm

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