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Mature Skin on the Menu

Contact Author Shawnda Brooks, Sothys
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Have you ever heard the phrase, “If I knew back then, what I know now?” This phrase can apply to numerous things in life, but we do not want our clients saying that about their skin care knowledge. As estheticians and spa professionals, we have the unique opportunity to intervene and educate our clients on ways they can maintain their youthful appearance, as their skin matures.

Mature is defined as having reached the most advanced stage in a process. Our clients need our guidance on the best treatments, products and procedures to progress through whatever stage they are currently in, so they can achieve their best skin results throughout the aging process.

When Do We Start?

Most anti-aging products target clients who are 25 and older. However, we know that our chronological (intrinsic) age is not the only factor in deciding to recommend age-defying products. Our biological (extrinsic) age, which is based on biomarkers—like stress or environment—is also a factor.

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Clients with excessive sun exposure, or those on certain medications, may experience an acceleration in the aging process, and their biological age can be altered. For example, a 27-year-old surfing instructor taking medication that causes photosensitivity that does not use sun protection, may have a biological age of 35. While a 43-year-old personal trainer with a healthy diet and disciplined skin care regimen may also have a biological age of 35. Other extrinsic aging culprits are smoking, alcohol abuse and drug use.

Continue reading about mature skin in our Digital Magazine...

Shawnda Brooks is a national educator and lifetime student of the spa industry. She is an Army veteran who became a Forbes trained massage therapist and esthetician. She has worked with some of the top hotel brands in the country and is a firm believer in self-care and natural beauty.

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