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7 Questions To Ask Before You Quit Your Job and Go Solo

Contact Author Regina Tucker
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It was perhaps her biggest dream ever imagined—owning her own studio. At that time, she was full of excitement and full of hope about what was to come, but now things weren’t going as planned. When she opened her studio, she never imagined having to shut its doors or the possibility of things not working out. She never imagined that she would want the consistency of being an employee back in her life, that she would want the responsibility of only herself and her clients. Many estheticians dream of one day having their own business, and it is easy to see the dollar signs and potential of your business idea. But, the day-to-day realities of actually running a business can prove to be too much for some individuals.

1. Can you meet emotional demands?

Starting a business is a big decision that encompasses more than just business, marketing and social media plans. It also involves an individual’s ability to manage the many tough emotions that go along with it. If you are considering making the transition to full-time entrepreneur and are not sure if you should take the leap, here are seven questions to ask yourself first.

Running a business can be emotionally taxing. There will be obstacles and barriers that can sometimes impede your success. Before venturing out on your own, ask yourself if you are emotionally ready to handle these hurdles. While there is no way to predict how you will react in every difficult situation, you certainly can assess if you are emotionally capable of dealing with unpredictable and tough ones.

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Some questions to ask yourself are below.

Do you have a support system of professional colleagues? This is important so that you do not burn out family and friends with workplace issues.

Do you have a support group or counselor to reach out to in times of crisis? This is important if things reach a point where you need a critical level of support.

Do you have emotional trying circumstances that may impact your ability to lead your business? Divorce, recent or impending death of a loved one and caring for an elderly or disabled family member are all things that can impact how you run your business. Are you prepared for those times when the challenges in life and business simultaneously collide?

These are all important questions to ask as you assess your possible transition. Many business owners love challenges, and having to navigate through difficult emotional and business challenges does not divert them from there purpose. Instead, they readily accept the challenge and are able to successfully balance running their business and managing their emotional needs. Other individuals struggle with managing difficult emotions and starting new projects at the same time. The combination of emotional and work stress would only add additional strain into the lives of these individuals. Before you leave your job to go solo, be sure to ask yourself if you are emotionally ready to meet the demands of running your business.

2. Can you handle longer hours?

A new business means time spent nurturing and growing it. In the beginning, your work-life balance may be a little off as you grow your business, and you may miss a friend’s dinner party or an evening out with a loved one. Sometimes you will feel like the days are absolutely running into each other with work; the phone will not stop ringing, and e-mails will not stop pouring in. Networking events that happen after work hours will also occupy your time. These things that take up additional time are not always optional and often must be worked into your calendar just like family vacations and other non-negotiable calendar personal matters. You will no longer be able to call it quits after your last client leaves for the day.

3. Are you ready to become HR?

Say goodbye to your human resources (HR) department, as you are now responsible for your retirement, medical, salary and insurance benefits. Not everyone is eager to become the HR department and make decisions on healthcare and other HR-related matters. This is a huge responsibility, and you might have to take a few classes or hire an HR professional to help you manage these tasks. This is also particularly important to consider if you plan on expanding your business one day and hiring more employees.

4. Are you ready for the financial responsibility?

There are major financial implications when you take on the responsibility of running a business. As a small business owner, you are responsible for managing your assets and money properly. In an ideal world, an entrepreneur would have a strong financial foundation, manage their credit properly and have no financial stress. However, this ideal is not the case for many small business owners and can add to the pressure of running a business. A difficulty in an individual’s personal finances does not mean they cannot run a business. It means that you need to be careful and avoid temptations such as taking out hefty loans and incurring too much if any unsecured debt. Be sure to take time in the beginning to get clear about your expenses, operating costs and financial goals.

5. Can you ask for help?

It’s easy to think you can do everything as an independent business owner. However, when you work within your business, your primary job when clients come through the door is serving them. There are a myriad of tasks associated with running a business, and you have to know not only when to ask for help but what task to get assistance with. Do you really want to spend three to five hours working on your own website when you could be making money taking clients? Even if you have strong strengths in one particular area, that does not mean you have the time to do it. You have to determine where your time is best spent and ask for help in those areas that could use support.

6. Are you ready for a lifestyle change?

Running a business definitely changes your lifestyle. As your business grows and you become the face of it, you may be asked to speak at different functions and events and with the press. These types of activities can be challenging for individuals that like to stay behind the scenes, but these things come with being an entrepreneur and can definitely impact your lifestyle. Are you ready for more e-mails, interview requests and pictures with strangers? Running a business changes your life.

7. Are you ready to step up your leadership?

As the boss and leader of your own company, people will be coming to you more, asking questions and wanting approval on all matters that relate to your business. From sales representatives offering new products to influencers’ reaching out to collaborate, you are now the person that everyone wants to talk to. For some individuals, that thought alone is a deal breaker, while others can’t wait for that day to come.

Whether you decide to continue on as an employee or venture out on your own as a solo practitioner, the decision should not be taken lightly. Sometimes, you may not know which role you prefer until you try it out for yourself. No matter your decision, you should align yourself with a supportive community, commit to being excellent and keep an open mind about your possibilities.

Regina Tucker is a licensed esthetician and creative director of CRUMM Skin + Beauty. She is also the blogger behind beautifullyyoursmetro.com. Tucker has a master’s of science degree in human resources development.

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