Most Popular in:

Physiology

Email This Item! Print This Item!

Rougher Microdermabrasion Shown to Be More Effective

Posted: October 22, 2009

page 2 of 3

To find out, Karimipour's team took skin samples from the arms of 40 people with sun-damaged skin. Samples were taken before and after the participants had microdermabrasion with either a coarse- or medium-grit, diamond-studded wand. The researchers found that the course-grit diamond increased the production of compounds associated with wound healing and skin remodeling. These included cytokeratin 16, which helps skin heal after injury.

In addition, the coarse-grit buffing produced antimicrobial peptides that fight infection and substances that break down the skin's structural proteins to let the skin rebuild. The researchers also found that skin produced other substances that induce collagen production. These changes were not seen in skin treated with the medium-grit device, they noted.

Their findings are published in the October issue of Archives of Dermatology.

"This research gives us the basis to believe that aggressive microdermabrasion abrasion could potentially result in beneficial effects like we see in other more aggressive procedures, like laser resurfacing," Karimipour said. However, he predicted that aggressive microdermabrasion would not replace laser resurfacing. Microdermabrasion is not for the most severe cases but rather for fine-line wrinkles and shallow acne scars, he said.

Jeffrey Salomon, MD, an assistant clinical professor of plastic surgery at Yale University School of Medicine, said, "The more damage induced to the skin, by whatever mechanism, the stronger the body's repair response."

Want to See More News Like This?

Subscribe to the e-newsletter for free and receive news, articles and headlines just like this, delivered directly to your inbox.