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Apr
26
2007

WEB EXCLUSIVE: The New Face of Beautiful Aging

By Nancy Jefferies

Science, philosophy and evolution have ushered in a new and long overdue perspective on aging.

Apr
24
2007

Dermatologists Best for Melanoma Diagnosis

Getting melanoma diagnosed by a dermatologist rather than a non-specialist could boost a patient's odds for long-term survival, a new study finds.

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta studied 1,467 patients with melanoma diagnosed by a dermatologist and 553 melanoma patients diagnosed by a non-dermatologist.

On average, tumors diagnosed by dermatologists were thinner than those diagnosed by non-dermatologists -- 0.86 millimeters vs. 1 millimeter thick. When a melanoma tumor is still relatively thin (less than 1 millimeter), patients have a 90 percent cure rate.

Patients diagnosed by a dermatologist also had better survival rates.

"The two-year and five-year survival rates were 86.5 percent and 73.9 percent for the dermatologist group compared with 78.8 percent and 68.7 percent for the non-dermatologist group," the study authors wrote.

"These results suggest that increasing access to dermatologists, particularly for older patients who have higher rates of melanoma, may represent one approach to improving melanoma-related health outcomes from a health policy perspective," they concluded.

The study appears in the April issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology.

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer, and can be fatal. Each year in the United States, more than 53,600 people learn they have the disease. In some parts of the world, especially Western countries, melanoma is becoming more common every year. In the United States, for example, the percentage of people who develop melanoma has more than doubled in the past 30 years, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Apr
23
2007

Baby Boomers Not as Healthy as Their Parents

Despite more health benefit options available to them than at any time in history, America's Baby Boomers may not be even so healthy as their parents.

The Washington Post reports that as the first wave of Baby Boomers -- a generation of Americans born between 1948 and 1964 -- heads toward retirement, surveys indicate they describe their own health as less than ideal.

As a matter of fact, the Post reports, a major study indicates that Boomers say they have more problems with cholesterol, diabetes, blood pressure and physical exertion than the previous generation born between 1936 and 1941.

"We're seeing some very powerful evidence all pointing to parallel findings," the newspaper quotes Mark Hayward, a sociologist at the University of Texas at Austin, as saying. "The trend seems to be that people are not as healthy as they approach retirement as they were in older generations. It's very disturbing."

One of the primary reasons for the decline in good health, researchers speculate, is that previous generations were much more physically active in their daily routines, the Post reports. The number of Baby Boomers who said they were overweight might be a key to the decline in good health, the newspaper said.

HealthDay News, April 22, 2007

Apr
09
2007

Tai Chi Boosts Immune System Against Shingles

Tai chi, an exercise that features slow martial arts-like movements and meditation, significantly improves the ability of older adults' immune systems to fight the virus -- varicella zoster -- that causes shingles, a new study says.

Shingles is a painful, blistery rash. About one-third of adults over age 60 develop shingles.

The 25-week study, conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles, involved 112 people, ages 59 to 86. The researchers found that Tai chi, by itself, increased immunity against varicella zoster to a level that was comparable to having received the standard vaccine against the virus.

When a person did Tai chi and received the vaccine, the immunity against the virus reached a level normally seen in middle age, said the study, which was published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The study results confirm that a behavioral intervention such as Tai chi can trigger a positive, virus-specific immune response, said lead author Michael Irwin, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA.

"These are exciting findings, because the positive results of this study also have implications for other infectious diseases, like influenza and pneumonia. Since older adults often show blunted protective responses to vaccines, this study suggests that T'ai chi is an approach that might complement and augment the efficacy of other vaccines, such as influenza," Irwin, who is also director of the UCLA Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, said in a prepared statement.

HealthDay News, 4/6/2007

Mar
28
2007

Smoking May Increase Body Wrinkles

Smoking may increase wrinkles on parts of the body other than the face -- even on areas usually covered with clothes.

Cigarette smoking has long been linked to increased facial wrinkles. A new study shows that that may also be true of the rest of the body.

Yolanda Helfrich, MD, and colleagues studied 82 people at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor's dermatology clinic.

Participants were 22-91 years old (average age: 56). Most were white; 41 had a history of smoking.

Helfrich's team interviewed participants about smoking, sun exposure, sunscreen use, tanning, and other lifestyle factors.

A medical photographer took pictures of each participant's upper inner arm.

The photos were reviewed by three judges (two dermatology residents and one medical student) who didn't know which participants were smokers.

The judges used a nine-point scale developed by Helfrich's team. A rating of 0 indicated no fine wrinkling; severe fine wrinkling yielded the maximum score of 8.

Smoking and Wrinkles

Nearly two-thirds of the participants had low wrinkle scores ranging from 0-2 points. Smokers generally had the highest scores, indicating deeper wrinkles.

The wrinkle risk was particularly strong for people who had smoked heavily for many years.

"We examined nonfacial skin that was protected from the sun, and found that the total number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day and the total years a person has smoked were linked with the amount of skin damage a person experienced," Helfrich says in a University of Michigan news release.

The study doesn't prove that smoking caused or worsened wrinkles. But the results held when the researchers took other factors, including participants' age, into account.

The study appears in the Archives of Dermatology.

By Miranda Hitti, WebMd, March 19, 2007

Mar
21
2007

Sunscreen Technology, Regulations and Formulations

By Ken Klein

Learn about the state of sunscreens in the United States today and how a better understanding of them can lead to enhanced customer service for your clients.

Mar
21
2007

Duct Tape Won't Treat Warts

Duct tape has many uses, but the claim that it's a cheap, effective treatment for warts is challenged by a new U.S. study in the March issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology.

A small study in 2002 suggested that duct tape helped treat warts on children and young adults. The theory is that the tape irritates the skin and prompts the immune system to attack the virus that causes warts, the Associated Press reported.

But this new study found that warts disappeared in 21 percent of 39 patients who used duct tape for seven days, compared to 22 percent of 41 patients who used moleskin, a cotton-type bandage used to protect the skin.

This new study used transparent duct tape, while the 2002 study used the better-known gray duct tape. Grey duct tape contains rubber while transparent duct tape does not, the AP reported.

"Whether or not the standard type of duct type is effective is up in the air," said study co-author Dr. Rachel Wenner of the University of Minnesota. "Theoretically, the rubber adhesive could somehow stimulate the immune system or irritate the skin in a different manner."

HealthDay News, March 20, 2007

Mar
20
2007

ASAPS Reports Cosmetic Procedures on the Rise

Nearly 11.5 million cosmetic surgical and nonsurgical procedures were performed in the United States in 2006, according to statistics released today by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS). Compared to 2005, cosmetic surgical and nonsurgical increased 1%. The Aesthetic Society, which has been collecting multispecialty procedural statistics since 1997, says the overall number of cosmetic procedures has increased 446% since the collection of the statistics first began. The most frequently performed procedure was injectable fillers and the most popular surgical procedure was liposuction.

The top nonsurgical cosmetic procedures include injectable fillers, hyaluronic acid, laser hair removal, microdermabrasion and laser skin resurfacing.

Click here for more information.

Mar
16
2007

Having a Sense of Humor May Mean a Longer Life

Adults who can laugh at life's ups and downs may live longer than those who have trouble cracking a smile, concludes a Norwegian study of about 54,000 people tracked for seven years.

At the start of the study, participants filled out questionnaires on how easily they found humor in everyday life and how important they felt it was to have a humorous perspective, USA Today reported.

People who scored in the highest 25% of humor appreciation were 35% more likely to be alive at the end of seven years than those in the bottom quarter, the study found.

The survival advantage of having a humorous outlook was especially noticeable in a subgroup of 2,015 cancer patients. Those with a healthy sense of humor were about 70%less likely to die than those with a weak sense of humor, USA Today reported.

The study was presented at a meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society.

Mar
07
2007

Spa Radiance Debuts Eco-friendly Mani/Pedi Bar

Spa Radiance in San Francisco is opening a manicure/pedicure bar called PURE that’s eco-friendly just in time for Earth Day 2007. An array of nail treatments will be done with natural products. 451-346-6281