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Vitamin Injections Big in Japan

Posted: October 6, 2009

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Registered nurses and doctors administer the drips at Tenteki, but there's no conclusive medical evidence to back up the health claims. Many nutritionists actually caution against using injectable vitamin supplements because the quantities are not regulated. "More is not necessarily better ... some vitamins and minerals can be toxic in high doses," particularly the fat-soluble ones which the body stores like Vitamins A, D, E and K, explained Claire Williamson, nutrition scientist at the British Nutrition Foundation.

In Europe and the United States, vitamin shots are popular among celebrities with hectic lifestyles and little time to sleep, particularly vitamin B12. Former Spice Girl Geri Halliwell and singer Robbie Williams have both confirmed they've used the shots as part of their diets to maintain stamina during tours.

Dermatological injections of vitamin C are also popular among women hoping to keep their skin looking young. Former supermodel Cindy Crawford has admitted using such injections to keep her skin firm and wrinkle-free.

According to Williamson, it does not matter if supplements are injected into the vein or into the skin. "At the end of the day, it will go into the bloodstream," she said. "Most of these nutrients we can get sufficiently from foods, and nutrients tend to be better absorbed by the body if they are consumed in foods."

CNN.com, October 5, 2009