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Spring into Action: April is National Rosacea Awareness Month

Posted: February 11, 2013

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“The good news is that medical therapy, combined with trigger avoidance, can help to reduce rosacea’s impact on most patients,” said Dr. Mark Dahl, chairman of the NRS Medical Advisory Board.

Survey results show respondents' social lives improve with medical therapy

In fact, the survey results showed that 63% of the respondents reported improvement in their social lives following medical therapy.

During Rosacea Awareness Month and throughout the year, the NRS will conduct public education activities to reach the millions of rosacea sufferers who may not realize they have a medical condition that can be treated, emphasizing the warning signs and urging those who suspect they may have rosacea to see a dermatologist. Bulk quantities of educational materials are available to health professionals for their patients through the NRS website at www.rosacea.org.

Although rosacea varies from one patient to another, the primary signs may include flushing or transient erythema (redness), persistent or nontransient erythema, papules (bumps) and pustules (pimples), or telangiectasia (visible blood vessels), according to the NRS standard classification of rosacea, developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 17 experts worldwide.

Secondary features may include burning or stinging, plaques (raised patches on the skin), a dry appearance, edema (swelling), ocular manifestations and phymatous changes, in which the skin thickens. The standard subtypes of rosacea reflect the most common patterns of signs and symptoms, and characteristics of more than one subtype may occur at the same time.