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Physiology

New in Physiology (page 64 of 74)

Nov
14
2007

Rosacea Can Be Caused by Excess Protein

Researchers now believe they have found a key mechanism that drives rosacea.

Nov
13
2007

Too Much Sugar May Cause Wrinkles

Experts now believe that a lifetime of overeating sugar can make skin dull and wrinkled.

Nov
12
2007

Researchers Map Genes Causing Dandruff, Other Skin Conditions

A team at Procter & Gamble Beauty sequenced the genome of Malassezia globosa, a fungus that grows on the skin of between 50-90% of the population.

Oct
30
2007

Broccoli May Help Fight Skin Cancer

Scientists have discovered that an extract of broccoli sprouts protects the skin against the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays.

Oct
24
2007

The Fitzpatrick Skin Type Classification Scale

The Fitzpatrick Skin Type Classification system was developed in 1975 by Harvard Medical School dermatologist Thomas Fitzpatrick, MD, PhD.

Oct
22
2007

Women More Likely Than Men to be Affected by Adult Acne

In particular, women experience acne at higher rates than their male counterparts across all age groups 20 years and older.

Sep
27
2007

Experimental Skin Cancer Drug Shows Promise

An experimental drug called STA-4783 may prove an effective new treatment for skin cancer, according to research presented Wednesday at a meeting of the European Cancer Organization in Barcelona, Spain.

The drug causes tumor cells to self-destruct by overloading them with oxygen. A study of 81 patients with advanced melanoma skin cancer found that the 28 who received the standard chemotherapy drug paclitaxel went an average of 1.8 months before their cancer worsened. The 53 patients who received paclitaxel plus STA-4783 went an average of 3.7 months before their cancer worsened, the Associated Press reported.

The study also found that patients who received the combination therapy survived an average of one year after diagnosis, compared with an average of 7.8 months for those who received only paclitaxel. The study was paid for by Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. of Lexington, Mass., which developed STA-4783.

The new drug, which has no effect on normal cells, may also prove effective against other cancers, the AP reported.

HealthDay News, September 26, 2007

Sep
19
2007

Chemical Reaction: Age, Rage and the Skin

By Steve Herman

Beyond the well-known ravagers of youthful-looking skin, sugar and the chemical reactions that produce sugar in our cells conspire against eternal youth.

Sep
19
2007

Smoking May Increase Threat of Acne for Females

Female smokers may be much more likely to develop non-inflammatory acne (NIA) than women who don't smoke, says an Italian study in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Researchers looked at more than 1,000 women and found that 40 percent of those who smoked had NIA, compared with 10 percent of nonsmokers. Blocked pores, large white heads and small cysts are characteristic of NIA, BBC News reported.

The team at the San Gallicano Dermatological Institute in Rome said they conducted the study in women because the condition seems to be more prevalent in women than in men. Compared to nonsmokers, smokers in the study had half the levels of skin secretions of vitamin E and had other skin-related variations. The study also found that smokers who had acne in their teens were four times more likely to suffer NIA than nonsmokers who experienced teen acne.

The findings add to previous research that links smoking with acne, Colin Holden, president of the British Association of Dermatologists, told BBC News.

HealthDay News, September 18, 2007

Sep
19
2007

Skin Cooling After Laser Treatments Could Boost Hyperpigmentation Risk

Although it's meant to protect the skin, a cooling technique may actually boost the risk of hyperpigmentaion (discoloration) in dark-skinned patients after laser treatment for mole-like skin lesions, Thai researchers warn.

"It is not life-threatening, but postinflammatory hyperpigmentation may cause substantial psychological problems," wrote a team from Mahidol University in Bangkok. "The treatment of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is difficult and time-consuming, often lasting many months to achieve the desired results, which causes frustration in patients and physicians," they added.

Some experts have suggested that skin cooling -- which decreases pain and allows the use of higher laser frequencies -- may help reduce hyperpigmentation after laser treatment.

In this study, researchers used laser irradiation to treat 23 Thai women (average age 43) with Hori's nevus, blue-brown pigmented spots on the skin that develop later in life.

"One randomly selected face side of each patient was cooled using a cold air cooling device during and 30 seconds before and after laser irradiation, and the other side was irradiated without cooling," the researchers wrote.

Hyperpigmentation in the patients was assessed before treatment and one, two, three, four and 12 weeks after treatment.

Of the 21 patients who completed the study, 13 (62 percent) developed hyperpigmentation on the cooled side of the face, five (24 percent) developed the condition on the uncooled side, one patient (five percent) developed it on both sides of the face, and two (10 percent) did not have any hyperpigmentation.

The cooled sides were also three times more likely to develop hyperpigmentation than the uncooled sides, the authors said. Most cases developed two weeks after treatment. All but one of the cases were completely resolved 12 weeks after treatment.

The study was published in the September issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology.

HealthDay News, September 18, 2007