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Two-pronged Attack Best for Psoriasis Treatment

Posted: May 7, 2009

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Steven Feldman, MD, is a professor of dermatology, pathology and public health sciences at Wake Forest University. “The goal of therapy for psoriasis is to strike a balance between the irritation sometimes seen with Vitamin D analogues and thinning of the skin that is an adverse effect of long-term corticosteroid use,” he said. “This study makes it clear scientifically that there will be no one-size-fits-all solution in treating this condition. The review is an evidence-based confirmation of what most of us knew from experience.”

While the results show that the corticosteroids work as well as the Vitamin D products with fewer short-term side effects, he cautioned against interpreting this review as a call to forego the more expensive Vitamin D analogues. “The idea that corticosteroids are safer somehow is misleading,” Feldman said. “That doesn’t take into account that the more serious side effects that occur with long-term continuous use of the corticosteroid drugs.”

The review disclosed that three of its five co-authors have received funding from pharmaceutical companies that make medications used to treat psoriasis.

Journal reference: 1. Mason AR, et al. Topical treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2009, Issue No. 2

Adapted from materials provided by Center for Advancing Health.