Most Popular in:

Alternative Therapy Treatments

New in Alternative Therapy Treatments (page 17 of 20)

Mar
27
2008

Spa Spiritual Renewal: A Holistic Facial

By: By Jea'nah Jens

Learn to combine several uncommon techniques to create a one-of-a-kind facial for your clients.

Mar
26
2008

Viewpoint: Anti-inflammation and Visible Skin Aging

By Carl Thornfeldt, MD

The fountain of youth may be discovered through reducing inflammation--both internally and externally.

Mar
25
2008

Music Becoming Popular in Medical Treatments

Music is coming to play a larger role in the treatment of a range of illnesses, indicating a growing interest in alternative wellness therapies.

Feb
27
2008

Acupuncture May Alleviate Menstrual Pain

New research released by German researchers shows that in addition to treating other types of pain, acupuncture can be useful in helping women treat menstrual pain.

Jan
28
2008

Wellness Services Prompting More Client Questions

As spas are beginning to offer more services that cater to wellness and health, industry experts are encouraging clients ask more questions.

Jan
08
2008

Too Much Perfume Might Signal Depression

Researchers from Tel Aviv University have found depression can supress womens' sense of smell.

Jan
03
2008

How-to: The Sedona Sacred Clay Energy Restorer Ritual

By Jill Winberg and Angela Lingenfelter

Bring a bit of the desert into the treatment room with this re-energizing experience.

Dec
14
2007

Managing the Effect Stress Has on Skin

Stress can cause problems with skin, hair and nails. The American Academy of Dermatology has recommendations on how to curb those effects.

Nov
09
2007

Testing Well-Being Effect of Cosmetics

The R&D department of the Dermscan Group has developed a series of new tests that evaluate the well-being effect of beauty products on a consumer.

Nov
01
2007

Chinese Herbs May Help Alleviate Menstrual Cramps

A study involving nearly 3,500 women in several countries suggests that Chinese herbs might be more effective in relieving menstrual cramps than drugs, acupuncture or heat compression.
Australia-based researchers said herbs not only relieved pain, but reduced the recurrence of the condition over three months, according to the Cochrane Library journal.
“All available measures of effectiveness confirmed the overall superiority of Chinese herbal medicine to placebo, no treatment, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), OCPs (oral contraceptive pill), acupuncture and heat compression,” said lead author Xiaoshu Zhu from the Centre for Complementary Medicine Research at the University of Western Sydney.
Period pain affects as many as 50 percent of women of reproductive age and between 60 percent to 85 percent of teenaged girls, leading to absences from school and work.
While the cause is still under debate, it is believed to be linked to an imbalance in ovarian hormones.
Chinese herbal medicine has been used to treat the condition for hundreds of years and women are increasingly looking for non-drug treatments.
The survey involved 39 trials — 36 in China, and one each in Taiwan, Japan and the Netherlands.
Participants given herbal concoctions were prescribed herbs that regulated their ‘qi’ (energy) and blood, warmed their bodies and boosted their kidney and liver functions.
Some of these include Chinese angelica root (danggui), Szechuan lovage root (chuanxiong), red peony root (chishao), white peony root (baishao), Chinese motherwort (yimucao), fennel fruit (huixiang), nut-grass rhizome (xiangfu), liquorice root (gancao) and cinnamon bark (rougui).
In one trial involving 36 women, 53 percent of those who took herbs reported less pain than usual compared with 26 percent in the placebo group.
But the researchers said more studies were needed because of the relatively small numbers of participants in each of the trials.

Reuters, October 17, 2007