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Medical Esthetics Treatments

New in Medical Esthetics Treatments (page 29 of 31)

Feb
01
2008

Spa MD: Be True to Your Clients

By: Steven H. Dayan, MD and Terri Wojak

Before endorsing a new product, take these steps in order to ensure claims are easily realized.

Jan
24
2008

Clinique Forms Strategic Collaboration

Company's new collaboration with Allergan, Inc. to develop line to address the need for specialized skin care as medical aesthetics market grows; to be sold exclusively in physicians' offices...

Jan
21
2008

Gene Supression May Aid in Scar-free Skin Healing

Skin may be able to heal more quickly and with less scarring by supressing a particular gene, according to University of Bristol researchers.

Jan
21
2008

Spa, MD: Striking a Balance

By Paul Hester, MD

Adaptability and focus are the keys to fostering a successful balance between medical and esthetics in a medical spa.

Jan
16
2008

New Ingredients in Cosmeceuticals Aid in Improving Skin

Recent research shows that the addition of ingredients such as niacin and peptides can help treat various conditions in mature skin.

Jan
04
2008

Web Site Surveys Most Profitable Services in Medical Spas and Practices

The market analysis Web site Feed-back.com has released survey research on what services are found to be most valuable in dermatology, medical spa and plastic surgery facilities.

Dec
18
2007

Study Finds Massage Relieves Pain After Surgery

U.S. researchers have found that patients treated with massage in postsurgical situations have experienced less pain.

Sep
19
2007

Skin Cooling After Laser Treatments Could Boost Hyperpigmentation Risk

Although it's meant to protect the skin, a cooling technique may actually boost the risk of hyperpigmentaion (discoloration) in dark-skinned patients after laser treatment for mole-like skin lesions, Thai researchers warn.

"It is not life-threatening, but postinflammatory hyperpigmentation may cause substantial psychological problems," wrote a team from Mahidol University in Bangkok. "The treatment of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is difficult and time-consuming, often lasting many months to achieve the desired results, which causes frustration in patients and physicians," they added.

Some experts have suggested that skin cooling -- which decreases pain and allows the use of higher laser frequencies -- may help reduce hyperpigmentation after laser treatment.

In this study, researchers used laser irradiation to treat 23 Thai women (average age 43) with Hori's nevus, blue-brown pigmented spots on the skin that develop later in life.

"One randomly selected face side of each patient was cooled using a cold air cooling device during and 30 seconds before and after laser irradiation, and the other side was irradiated without cooling," the researchers wrote.

Hyperpigmentation in the patients was assessed before treatment and one, two, three, four and 12 weeks after treatment.

Of the 21 patients who completed the study, 13 (62 percent) developed hyperpigmentation on the cooled side of the face, five (24 percent) developed the condition on the uncooled side, one patient (five percent) developed it on both sides of the face, and two (10 percent) did not have any hyperpigmentation.

The cooled sides were also three times more likely to develop hyperpigmentation than the uncooled sides, the authors said. Most cases developed two weeks after treatment. All but one of the cases were completely resolved 12 weeks after treatment.

The study was published in the September issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology.

HealthDay News, September 18, 2007

Aug
22
2007

New Technologies Tighten Skin Without Surgery

Speaking today at the American Academy of Dermatology’s Summer Academy Meeting 2007, dermatologist David J. Goldberg, MD, JD, FAAD, clinical professor of dermatology and director of laser research at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, N.Y., discussed the rapidly expanding area of skin-tightening techniques and how they can safely and effectively treat sagging skin on the jowls, neck, arms, and stomach, as well as cellulite.

Apr
24
2007

Dermatologists Best for Melanoma Diagnosis

Getting melanoma diagnosed by a dermatologist rather than a non-specialist could boost a patient's odds for long-term survival, a new study finds.

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta studied 1,467 patients with melanoma diagnosed by a dermatologist and 553 melanoma patients diagnosed by a non-dermatologist.

On average, tumors diagnosed by dermatologists were thinner than those diagnosed by non-dermatologists -- 0.86 millimeters vs. 1 millimeter thick. When a melanoma tumor is still relatively thin (less than 1 millimeter), patients have a 90 percent cure rate.

Patients diagnosed by a dermatologist also had better survival rates.

"The two-year and five-year survival rates were 86.5 percent and 73.9 percent for the dermatologist group compared with 78.8 percent and 68.7 percent for the non-dermatologist group," the study authors wrote.

"These results suggest that increasing access to dermatologists, particularly for older patients who have higher rates of melanoma, may represent one approach to improving melanoma-related health outcomes from a health policy perspective," they concluded.

The study appears in the April issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology.

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer, and can be fatal. Each year in the United States, more than 53,600 people learn they have the disease. In some parts of the world, especially Western countries, melanoma is becoming more common every year. In the United States, for example, the percentage of people who develop melanoma has more than doubled in the past 30 years, according to the National Cancer Institute.