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New in Facial Treatments (page 33 of 33)

Jun
14
2006

Extra Wrinkles a Bad Sign for Smokers

British scientists have discovered a tantalizing new wrinkle in our understanding of smoking's unhealthy effects.

Middle-aged smokers whose faces were heavily wrinkled were five times as likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than smokers whose faces were relatively smooth, the study found.

The authors speculated that both COPD and wrinkling may be linked by a common mechanism and that facial wrinkling might indicate susceptibility to the potentially deadly lung disease.

It's unclear, however, what kind of clinical relevance the findings hold.

"It's certainly biologically plausible," said Dr. Norman Edelman, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association. "This may be of use in educating patients but, in terms of detection of lung disease, we [already] have a simple breathing test. We don't have to look for wrinkles."

The research appears in the June 14 online edition of Thorax, which is published by the British Medical Journal.

COPD refers to a group of progressive chronic lung diseases, including emphysema and bronchitis, that block the airways and restrict oxygen flow.

Some 13.5 million Americans suffer from COPD, and the World Health Organization predicts that the condition will become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020.

Smoking is the biggest risk factor for COPD, and dermatologist have long noted that smoking causes premature aging of the skin.

However, not all smokers go on to develop COPD. "Obviously, people vary in their response to what's in the smoke," Edelman said.

In the study, the team wanted to see if genetic factors that predispose smokers to COPD might also predispose them to wrinkles.

The researchers, based at Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, analyzed data on 149 current and former middle-aged smokers, 68 of whom (45.6 percent) had COPD. The participants came from 78 families.

Eighty-three percent had no facial wrinkling or only minor lines, but close to 17 percent had considerable wrinkling.

Lung strength and function, measured in all participants, turned out to be significantly lower in those with extensive wrinkling than in those with smoother faces.

People with heavy wrinkles were also five times more likely to have COPD than those without wrinkles. People with facial wrinkling also had triple the risk of suffering from more severe emphysema.

The authors theorized that smoking-linked changes in cells' collagen and elastin may be important for the development of both lung disease and wrinkles.

The findings are more likely to be helpful in spurring new research than in providing any direct benefit to patients, Edelman said.

"I think this will be of use to basic biologists," he explained. "Maybe you can start doing experiments on the skin, maybe that's an easier model to use than the lung to figure out what the mechanisms are."

HealthDay News, June 14, 2006

May
24
2006

Germaine de Capuccini Introduces Spa Marine Privilege Therapies

Aesthetics Complete, Inc./Germaine de Capuccini introduces its Spa Marine Privilege therapies. Spa Pearl Therapy hydrates, smoothes, firms and covers the skin, and Spa Gold Therapy protects, stimulates and enriches. 800-842-9922, us@acispa.com

May
03
2006

Rosacea Discomfort Common

A recent survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society and published in Rosacea Review indicates that 93% of participants experienced at least some physical discomfort due to rosacea. The most common symptoms were facial burning, facial itching, stinging, swelling and tenderness.

Apr
17
2006

April is Rosacea Awareness Month

April is Rosacea Awareness Month, and experts want to alert people to the signs of this facial skin disorder affecting an estimated 14 million Americans.

"Rosacea is frustrating and baffling for so many people because its conspicuous signs and symptoms may not only come and go unexpectedly, but they can affect various individuals in ways few might imagine," Dr. Richard Odom, a professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco, said in a prepared statement.

"Unfortunately, without treatment rosacea tends to become progressively worse -- and can have a substantial impact both physically and on people's emotional, social and professional lives," Odom said.

Rosacea usually first appears between the ages of 30 and 60 and often resembles a sunburn or blush on the cheeks, nose, chin or forehead. It happens again and again, becoming ruddier and lasting longer each time. If the condition isn't treated, bumps and pimples can develop and grow more extensive over time. Burning, itching and stinging are common. Blood vessels can become visible in the face.

In severe cases, the nose may become enlarged from the development of excess tissue. The eyes are also affected in about 60 percent of people with rosacea. This can lead to vision problems.

"The good news is that, while rosacea cannot be cured, it can be effectively controlled with medical therapy and lifestyle changes," Odom said.

HeathDay News, April 15, 2006

Apr
10
2006

The Discomfort of Rosacea

A recent survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society and published in Rosacea Review indicates that 93% of participants experienced at least some physical discomfort due to rosacea. The most common symptoms were facial burning, facial itching, stinging, swelling and tenderness.