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The Synergy of Technology and Experience

By: David Suzuki
Posted: June 26, 2008, from the July 2008 issue of Skin Inc. magazine.

Regardless of what ailments or obstacles society faces, it is quick to look for new, sophisticated, exciting and what may appear to be faster, easier solutions to challenges, often before fully exploring the possibilities that may seem obvious.

The upside is that this seemingly human instinct keeps the search alive for greener grass, and has led to some of the greatest discoveries in history, including many diagnostic technologies that are being used today to better understand the very fundamentals of the human body, as well as the environment. As a result, the human race is entering a very exciting time in history where innovative diagnostics, logic, and new respect for the disciplines of the body and environment have begun to reveal the answers.

Galvani

In the early 1790s, an Italian anatomy professor at the University of Bologna named Luigi Galvani realized that detached frog legs could be activated with stimulation provided by low levels of externally applied energy. After many experiments, he became convinced that the frog legs themselves also contained their own source of hidden energy in the nerves and around the wound area. Galvani referred to this as “animal electricity.”

Excited with his new discoveries, he quickly declared his findings to his university peers, only to be ridiculed by some for what was considered to be an absurd claim. It was only after his death that Galvani was later credited for discovering bimetallic direct current (DC), which he used specifically to carry out his experiments. He also utilized silver in his experiments to conduct energy, and, without knowing it, discovered what is now known as the current of injury.

The current of injury

By the early 1970s, Robert O. Becker, MD, an orthopedic surgeon, was running full tilt with experiments primarily focused on regeneration and the electrical system of the body. Although there were many great scientists and physicians who had actively built upon Galvani’s theories, it was Becker—assisted by modern science—who was able to finally capture the mystery of the body electric, paying tribute to Galvani and all those who had participated along the way.