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Body Treatments

New in Body Treatments (page 31 of 33)

Aug
22
2007

Recent Advances in Slimming Treatments

By Karen A. Costa-Strachan, PhD

Learn how science is advancing in trimming treatments targeted at cellulite.

Aug
21
2007

Hispanic Teens Take More Skin Cancer Risks

Hispanic-American teens are more likely than their white peers to take risks that boost their odds for skin cancer, a new survey finds.

Reporting in the August issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology, a team at the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine surveyed 369 high school students (221 white Hispanics and 148 white non-Hispanics).

They found that Hispanic teens were more likely to use tanning beds, less likely to consider themselves at risk for skin cancer, and less likely to protect themselves from the sun.

Compared to white non-Hispanics, white Hispanics were:

  • More likely to tan deeply (44.2 percent vs. 31 percent).
  • About 1.8 times more likely to never or rarely use sun-protective clothing.
  • About twice as likely to never or rarely use sunscreen.
  • 2.5 times more likely to have used a tanning bed in the previous year.
  • 60 percent less likely to have heard of skin self-examination and 70 percent less likely to have been told how to do it.
  • Less likely to think they had an average or above-average risk for skin cancer (23.1 percent vs. 39.9 percent).

There's a real need to improve participation of white Hispanic students in skin cancer prevention programs, the authors concluded.

Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays is a major risk factor for skin cancers, and a person's majority of lifetime UV exposure occurs by age 18, the Miami team noted. White Hispanics have a lower rate of skin cancer than white non-Hispanics, but white Hispanics are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced skin cancer.

HealthDay News, August 20, 2007

Aug
15
2007

New Research About Cleansing and Maintaining Skin's Moisture

You see clients every day whose skin probably warrants more help than you can give them on a monthly or even bi-weekly basis.  While facial skin usually gets basic attention like cleansing and a moisturizer, the skin on the rest of the body can be too easily forgotten.  How often do you see a loyal facial client with dry, scaly elbows? These clients may be victims of chronic skin conditions like eczema or simply may not understand how to maintain their body skin between visits.

The good news is that recent enhancements in skincare technology provide answers to a common question estheticians encounter from clients:
“I love the way my skin feels after a massage or body wrap when it’s soft and healthy, but what can I do for my skin between my professional treatments?”  

Sharing new research can help clarify the relationship between cleansing and moisturizing; offering new details on what has always been a two-step process to keep both of these integral parts of the body’s skincare regimen from being at odds.

P&G Beauty

Jul
31
2007

The Ritz-Carlton, Naples Introduces Two Treatments

The Ritz-Carlton, Naples's spa introduced two new treatments: Drift Away, designed to soothe those who have trouble sleeping; and Body Training Systems, professionally choreographed exercise classes. 239-598-3300

Jul
31
2007

The Spa of Colonial Williamsburg Features Cultural Techniques

Incorporating techniques from colonial, African-American and American Indian cultures, The Spa of Colonial Williamsburg recently opened with multiple treatment and relaxation rooms. 800-688-6479

Jul
17
2007

Sawgrass Marriott Spa Offers Golf-based Spa Package

Sawgrass Marriott Resort & Spa in Ponte Verda Beach, FL, is offering a relaxing spa package called Green Envy to coincide with the golfing season. While men experience the nearby famed golf course, women can receive spa treatments, including the Aroma Body Glow and European Cleansing Facial. 800-457-4653

Jun
11
2007

The SháNah Spa and Wellness Center Offers Watsu Massage

The SháNah Spa and Wellness Center located in the Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa is offering Watsu massage, a combination of water and shiatsu therapy. One of a handful of American spas offering the treatment, the spa uses the procedure to help with total relaxation of the spinal column. 800-732-2240

May
23
2007

Triple Threat: The Three Keys to Fighting Aging Skin

By Diana L. Howard, PhD

Teach your clients about the three biochemical reactions that cause aging skin.

May
23
2007

Naprapathy Eases Back and Neck Pain

A therapy called naprapathy -- which involves massage, stretching and manipulation of the spine and other joints -- is more effective at treating neck and back pain than some conventional methods, according to a Swedish study of 409 patients.

The patients were divided into two groups. One group received naprapathy while the other group received support and advice from doctors, which included the common approach of encouraging patients to move and live normally despite their back and neck pain, Agence France-Presse reported.

After 12 weeks, 57 percent of the patients who received naprapathy said they felt much better, compared with 13 percent of patients in the other group. The study also found that 69 percent of those in the naprapathy group said they had noticeably less pain, compared with 42 percent in the control group.

By the end of the study, 19 percent of naprapathy patients had totally recovered from their back and neck pain, compared with seven percent of those in the control group, AFP reported.

The findings were published in the Clinical Journal of Pain.

HealthDay News, May 22, 2007

Mar
28
2007

Smoking May Increase Body Wrinkles

Smoking may increase wrinkles on parts of the body other than the face -- even on areas usually covered with clothes.

Cigarette smoking has long been linked to increased facial wrinkles. A new study shows that that may also be true of the rest of the body.

Yolanda Helfrich, MD, and colleagues studied 82 people at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor's dermatology clinic.

Participants were 22-91 years old (average age: 56). Most were white; 41 had a history of smoking.

Helfrich's team interviewed participants about smoking, sun exposure, sunscreen use, tanning, and other lifestyle factors.

A medical photographer took pictures of each participant's upper inner arm.

The photos were reviewed by three judges (two dermatology residents and one medical student) who didn't know which participants were smokers.

The judges used a nine-point scale developed by Helfrich's team. A rating of 0 indicated no fine wrinkling; severe fine wrinkling yielded the maximum score of 8.

Smoking and Wrinkles

Nearly two-thirds of the participants had low wrinkle scores ranging from 0-2 points. Smokers generally had the highest scores, indicating deeper wrinkles.

The wrinkle risk was particularly strong for people who had smoked heavily for many years.

"We examined nonfacial skin that was protected from the sun, and found that the total number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day and the total years a person has smoked were linked with the amount of skin damage a person experienced," Helfrich says in a University of Michigan news release.

The study doesn't prove that smoking caused or worsened wrinkles. But the results held when the researchers took other factors, including participants' age, into account.

The study appears in the Archives of Dermatology.

By Miranda Hitti, WebMd, March 19, 2007