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Aug
24
2006

Botox Reduces Facial Scarring

Botox injections can help facial wounds heal with less scarring, a small study finds.

"This is the first medication found to minimize scarring," senior author Dr. David Sherris, professor and chair of the department of otolaryngology at the University at Buffalo, said in a prepared statement.

His team published the study in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The study included 31 patients who suffered wounds to the forehead or had surgery to remove skin cancers from the forehead, an area that's particularly susceptible to scarring. The patients received either an injection of Botox or saline within 24 hours after wound closure.

Photographs were taken at the time the patients received the injections and again six months later. The photographs were reviewed by two facial plastic surgeons who weren't involved in the study. They rated the patients' wound healing on a scale of zero to 10, with 10 representing the best result. The two surgeons' scores were averaged to reach a final score for each patient.

The median scores for wounds injected with Botox were 8.9, compared to 7.1 for wounds injected with saline.

"The result is of substantial interest in the field of scar treatment. When a wound occurs, especially on the face, people are always worried about the scar. We can now try to improve scars with these injections," Sherris said.

The study was funded by a clinical research grant from the Mayo Clinic.

HealthDay News, August 24, 2006

Aug
02
2006

Rancho La Puerta Building Spa Cooking School

Rancho La Puerta breaks ground on a 4,500-square-foot spa cooking school. La Cocina Que Canta, Spanish for “The Kitchen That Sings,” will feature a large hands-on kitchen classroom, cookbook library and culinary gift shop. The school is scheduled to open in spring of 2007. 800-443-7565

Jul
26
2006

The Botox-like Facial

By Kellie K. Speed
Jul
26
2006

The Shang-Shung Institute Opens in U.S.

The Shang-Shung Institute of America recently launched its Tibetan Healing Center in Northampton, MA, featuring a certification program. 413-369-4928

Jul
24
2006

Little Dix Bay Adds to Facility

Little Dix Bay, A Rosewood Resort in the Caribbeanon Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands recently added a towering Hilltop Yoga Platform, offering clients a scenic view during their practice. In addition, the facility added eight junior suites and three hilltop villas. 284-495-5555, littledixbay@rosewoodhotels.com

Jul
14
2006

Natural Cosmetics Booming in France

Natural cosmetic sales are booming in France, increasing 40% in 2005, according to Organic Monitor, a business research and consulting company. Due to growing awareness of chemicals in products, consumers are shying away from traditional staples and opting for natural toiletries, makeup and hair care. A new study by Organic Monitor shows that sales are continuing to rise in 2006. In addition, with more than 1,700 choices on the market, organic products account for about one-fourth of all natural cosmetic sales.

Jul
11
2006

California Introduces Restrictive Senate Bill for Esthetic Practices

The California Senate has introduced Senate Bill 1423, which will restrict registered nurses, physician assistants and physicians who have esthetic practices from using laser and IPL systems. In addition, Massachusetts, Georgia and North Carolina are considering similar bills.

Jul
07
2006

Spa-Goers Focus on Cosmeceutical Treatments

According to “Cosmeceuticals in the U.S.,” a new report from market research publisher Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, American spa-goers have turned their attention from injectables to cosmeceutical treatments. Sales of products such as anti-wrinkle creams and home facial peel kits jumped 7% last year to more than $13.3 billion. Projections estimate that the cosmeceuticals market will surpass $17 billion in 2010, growing a total of 29.4% between 2005 and 2010.

Jun
30
2006

Bioelements Launches Sebum Control Massage Treatment

Try your hand at Bioelements’ Sebum Control Massage Treatment that treats oil-rich skin with soothing, nonstimulating massage techniques. 800-433-6650, info@bioelements.com

Jun
14
2006

Extra Wrinkles a Bad Sign for Smokers

British scientists have discovered a tantalizing new wrinkle in our understanding of smoking's unhealthy effects.

Middle-aged smokers whose faces were heavily wrinkled were five times as likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than smokers whose faces were relatively smooth, the study found.

The authors speculated that both COPD and wrinkling may be linked by a common mechanism and that facial wrinkling might indicate susceptibility to the potentially deadly lung disease.

It's unclear, however, what kind of clinical relevance the findings hold.

"It's certainly biologically plausible," said Dr. Norman Edelman, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association. "This may be of use in educating patients but, in terms of detection of lung disease, we [already] have a simple breathing test. We don't have to look for wrinkles."

The research appears in the June 14 online edition of Thorax, which is published by the British Medical Journal.

COPD refers to a group of progressive chronic lung diseases, including emphysema and bronchitis, that block the airways and restrict oxygen flow.

Some 13.5 million Americans suffer from COPD, and the World Health Organization predicts that the condition will become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020.

Smoking is the biggest risk factor for COPD, and dermatologist have long noted that smoking causes premature aging of the skin.

However, not all smokers go on to develop COPD. "Obviously, people vary in their response to what's in the smoke," Edelman said.

In the study, the team wanted to see if genetic factors that predispose smokers to COPD might also predispose them to wrinkles.

The researchers, based at Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, analyzed data on 149 current and former middle-aged smokers, 68 of whom (45.6 percent) had COPD. The participants came from 78 families.

Eighty-three percent had no facial wrinkling or only minor lines, but close to 17 percent had considerable wrinkling.

Lung strength and function, measured in all participants, turned out to be significantly lower in those with extensive wrinkling than in those with smoother faces.

People with heavy wrinkles were also five times more likely to have COPD than those without wrinkles. People with facial wrinkling also had triple the risk of suffering from more severe emphysema.

The authors theorized that smoking-linked changes in cells' collagen and elastin may be important for the development of both lung disease and wrinkles.

The findings are more likely to be helpful in spurring new research than in providing any direct benefit to patients, Edelman said.

"I think this will be of use to basic biologists," he explained. "Maybe you can start doing experiments on the skin, maybe that's an easier model to use than the lung to figure out what the mechanisms are."

HealthDay News, June 14, 2006