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Oct
30
2007

Broccoli May Help Fight Skin Cancer

Scientists have discovered that an extract of broccoli sprouts protects the skin against the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays.

Oct
24
2007

The Fitzpatrick Skin Type Classification Scale

The Fitzpatrick Skin Type Classification system was developed in 1975 by Harvard Medical School dermatologist Thomas Fitzpatrick, MD, PhD.

Oct
23
2007

Can a Leopard Change its Spots?

By Peter Muzikants, MD, and Lesley Wild, MD

Learn about the background and treatment options for pigmentation spots on the skin.

Oct
22
2007

Women More Likely Than Men to be Affected by Adult Acne

In particular, women experience acne at higher rates than their male counterparts across all age groups 20 years and older.

Oct
18
2007

Ancient Makeup Alters Timeline of Modern Man

164,000-year old makeup found in South Africa hallmark of modern life; challenges previous view of man’s marched into modernity…

Oct
17
2007

Coca Cola Opens Traditional Chinese Medicine Research Center

The Coca-Cola Company today announced the official opening of The Coca-Cola Research Center for Chinese Medicine at the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences in Beijing.

Oct
17
2007

New York Spa Introduces Specialized Treatments

Increasing its menu options, Enhance Face & Body Spa in Hartsdale, NY, has introduced a chiropractor-provided Cold Laser Therapy for extremity injuries and an age-lifting acupuncture face lift treatment from a licensed acupuncturist. 914-997-8878

Oct
16
2007

Personal Care Workers Have Highest Rates of Depression

Personal care workers have the highest rates of depression among full time workers in the United States.

Oct
12
2007

More Than Half of Lipstick Contains Lead, Says Consumer Rights Group; CTFA Responds

According to the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, lipstick manufactured in the United States contains surprisingly high levels of lead; CTFA states lead is naturally occurring.

Oct
11
2007

How to Handle Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

For many, wintertime means holidays spent with loved ones, warm nights snuggled by the fire and cool, sunny afternoons on the slopes. However, for up to eight million Americans who suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), this time of year can be very difficult. In fact, even more people experience sub-syndromal SAD, a mild form of SAD often referred to as "the winter blues" or "the winter blahs."

The nonprofit organization Mental Health America answers questions about SAD so that you can help yourself and your clients deal with symptoms during this time of year.

What is SAD?
SAD is a mood disorder associated with depression and related to seasonal variations of light. Brought on by the shorter days and longer nights, symptoms disappear completely in the spring.

Who gets it?
People in northern geographic areas, where days are shorter, are most affected. Women get SAD four times more often than men and women in their thirties are most at risk. It is not common in children and, for adults, risk decreases with age.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms may include sleep problems, lethargy, overeating, depression, social problems, anxiety, loss of libido and mood changes.

Is it treatable?
There are many effective options for treating SAD. Regardless of which treatment a person determines to work best, relief is possible.

How is it treated?
Primary treatment options include phototherapy (exposure to bright light for 30 minutes per day throughout the fall and winter) and increasing exposure to natural light. Antidepressant medications and psychotherapy are also possible treatments.

What should I do if I think I have SAD?
If a person worries they may have SAD, he or she should talk with a health professional.