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Aug
22
2007

Recent Advances in Slimming Treatments

By Karen A. Costa-Strachan, PhD

Learn how science is advancing in trimming treatments targeted at cellulite.

Aug
22
2007

New Technologies Tighten Skin Without Surgery

Speaking today at the American Academy of Dermatology’s Summer Academy Meeting 2007, dermatologist David J. Goldberg, MD, JD, FAAD, clinical professor of dermatology and director of laser research at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, N.Y., discussed the rapidly expanding area of skin-tightening techniques and how they can safely and effectively treat sagging skin on the jowls, neck, arms, and stomach, as well as cellulite.

Aug
21
2007

Hispanic Teens Take More Skin Cancer Risks

Hispanic-American teens are more likely than their white peers to take risks that boost their odds for skin cancer, a new survey finds.

Reporting in the August issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology, a team at the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine surveyed 369 high school students (221 white Hispanics and 148 white non-Hispanics).

They found that Hispanic teens were more likely to use tanning beds, less likely to consider themselves at risk for skin cancer, and less likely to protect themselves from the sun.

Compared to white non-Hispanics, white Hispanics were:

  • More likely to tan deeply (44.2 percent vs. 31 percent).
  • About 1.8 times more likely to never or rarely use sun-protective clothing.
  • About twice as likely to never or rarely use sunscreen.
  • 2.5 times more likely to have used a tanning bed in the previous year.
  • 60 percent less likely to have heard of skin self-examination and 70 percent less likely to have been told how to do it.
  • Less likely to think they had an average or above-average risk for skin cancer (23.1 percent vs. 39.9 percent).

There's a real need to improve participation of white Hispanic students in skin cancer prevention programs, the authors concluded.

Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays is a major risk factor for skin cancers, and a person's majority of lifetime UV exposure occurs by age 18, the Miami team noted. White Hispanics have a lower rate of skin cancer than white non-Hispanics, but white Hispanics are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced skin cancer.

HealthDay News, August 20, 2007

Aug
20
2007

Nail Salon Employees' Mental Functioning May be Affected by Chemicals

Are the 300,000 nail salon workers in the United States -- many of them Asian -- being negatively affected by the chemicals they use on their customers?

According to the New York Times, two recent studies indicate that the danger does exist and may affect mental acuity, both in those who work in nail salons and those whose mothers did.

A Wayne State University study found that prolonged work in nail salons was associated with poor performance on a variety of tests to determine a person's attention acuity, mental processing speed, memory and verbal learning, the Times reports. And another study by University of Toronto scientists found similar problems in children who were prenatally exposed.

"The intensity of exposure for salon workers is 1,200 times what it would be for the average American," Sonya Lunder, a senior analyst for the non-profit Environmental Working Group, told the newspaper. "Immigrant women often don't understand the safety information."

Three compounds long used in nail salons -- toluene, formaldehyde and dibutyl phthalate -- are on the denagrous list, the Times reports. Toluene is a colorless solvent, formaldehyde helps harden nails and dibutyl phthalate makes nail polish flexible. One company that makes the chemicals, OPI Products, has said it would begin removing toluene and dibutyl phthalate from its product list, the newspaper said.

HealthDay News

Aug
15
2007

New Research About Cleansing and Maintaining Skin's Moisture

You see clients every day whose skin probably warrants more help than you can give them on a monthly or even bi-weekly basis.  While facial skin usually gets basic attention like cleansing and a moisturizer, the skin on the rest of the body can be too easily forgotten.  How often do you see a loyal facial client with dry, scaly elbows? These clients may be victims of chronic skin conditions like eczema or simply may not understand how to maintain their body skin between visits.

The good news is that recent enhancements in skincare technology provide answers to a common question estheticians encounter from clients:
“I love the way my skin feels after a massage or body wrap when it’s soft and healthy, but what can I do for my skin between my professional treatments?”  

Sharing new research can help clarify the relationship between cleansing and moisturizing; offering new details on what has always been a two-step process to keep both of these integral parts of the body’s skincare regimen from being at odds.

P&G Beauty

Aug
01
2007

New Ingredients for Reversing Tone Imperfection

Staying on top of the newest developments in the field and introducing them to your clients allows you to continually re-establish yourself as their personal skincare expert.  With that in mind, you should know that anti-aging isn’t just about wrinkles anymore. Many scientists and dermatologists are confirming that the tone of a person’s skin is among the main identifiers in determining their age—the more even skin tone is, the younger a person looks.

Progress in anti-aging skin care has moved one step further due to the development of a breakthrough topical glucosamine complex. It treats uneven skin tone by targeting skin cells that overproduce melanin. Formerly used in arthritis treatments, topical glucosamine has been found to reduce age spots and improve skin barriers.

While many products already on the market can improve tone imperfections, they have had a tendency to contain ingredients, such as hydroquinone, that can be harsh and irritating to the skin.  This is among the first combinations to perfect skin tone while also improving the overall health of the skin.

P&G Beauty

Jul
31
2007

Rosacea Continues to Baffle

The National Rosacea Society recently released a study highlighting results that dispell the common myth that rosacea typically affects adults age 30–50. The study also found the skin disorder may develop new signs and symptoms decades after its initial onset. 888-662-5874

Jul
31
2007

The Ritz-Carlton, Naples Introduces Two Treatments

The Ritz-Carlton, Naples's spa introduced two new treatments: Drift Away, designed to soothe those who have trouble sleeping; and Body Training Systems, professionally choreographed exercise classes. 239-598-3300

Jul
31
2007

The Spa of Colonial Williamsburg Features Cultural Techniques

Incorporating techniques from colonial, African-American and American Indian cultures, The Spa of Colonial Williamsburg recently opened with multiple treatment and relaxation rooms. 800-688-6479

Jul
31
2007

Green Convergence

By Nancy Jeffries

The link between nutrition and beauty is inspiring a new breed of beauty products. Marketers are recognizing the value of rolling health care and beauty into overall treatment programs supported by eco-friendly products, and both manufacturers and consumers are feeling their way through a transition as conscience and economics converge.