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Oct
12
2007

More Than Half of Lipstick Contains Lead, Says Consumer Rights Group; CTFA Responds

According to the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, lipstick manufactured in the United States contains surprisingly high levels of lead; CTFA states lead is naturally occurring.

Oct
11
2007

How to Handle Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

For many, wintertime means holidays spent with loved ones, warm nights snuggled by the fire and cool, sunny afternoons on the slopes. However, for up to eight million Americans who suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), this time of year can be very difficult. In fact, even more people experience sub-syndromal SAD, a mild form of SAD often referred to as "the winter blues" or "the winter blahs."

The nonprofit organization Mental Health America answers questions about SAD so that you can help yourself and your clients deal with symptoms during this time of year.

What is SAD?
SAD is a mood disorder associated with depression and related to seasonal variations of light. Brought on by the shorter days and longer nights, symptoms disappear completely in the spring.

Who gets it?
People in northern geographic areas, where days are shorter, are most affected. Women get SAD four times more often than men and women in their thirties are most at risk. It is not common in children and, for adults, risk decreases with age.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms may include sleep problems, lethargy, overeating, depression, social problems, anxiety, loss of libido and mood changes.

Is it treatable?
There are many effective options for treating SAD. Regardless of which treatment a person determines to work best, relief is possible.

How is it treated?
Primary treatment options include phototherapy (exposure to bright light for 30 minutes per day throughout the fall and winter) and increasing exposure to natural light. Antidepressant medications and psychotherapy are also possible treatments.

What should I do if I think I have SAD?
If a person worries they may have SAD, he or she should talk with a health professional.

Oct
05
2007

President Bush Signs TAN Act

The TAN Act directs the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates tanning equipment, to re-examine the language and positioning of the warning label on indoor tanning devices.

Oct
03
2007

Give Back to Your Community: UV Warning Signal

Spas and dermatologists can give back to their community by giving a priceless gift: immediate sun danger awareness.

Oct
01
2007

11 Veggies That Don't Have to Be Organic

The best way to reap the health benefits of fruits and vegetables without exposing yourself to potentially harmful pesticides is to choose organic produce whenever possible, especially those varieties which are more likely to be contaminated. But if organic produce is cutting into your budget, it's okay to buy non-organic varieties of the fruits and vegetables listed below, which tend to contain the least amount of pesticides. However, make it a habit to wash them thoroughly before eating or cooking, to remove dirt and bacteria.  

  1. Asparagus
  2. Avocados
  3. Bananas
  4. Broccoli
  5. Cabbage
  6. Corn (sweet, frozen)
  7. Kiwi
  8. Mangos
  9. Onions
  10. Pineapples
  11. Peas (sweet, frozen)

From Drweil.com

Sep
25
2007

Acupuncture Eases Low Back Pain Better Than Medical Methods

Six months of traditional Chinese or even sham acupuncture treatment appeared more effective than conventional treatment ...

Sep
19
2007

Tempting Treatment Trends

By Abby Penning

Indigenous ingredients, medical technology and new markets are all inspiring spas to create signature services.

Sep
19
2007

The Male Market

By Howard Murad, MD, and Jeff Murad

Discover how men are becoming the new wave in skin care.

Sep
19
2007

Smoking May Increase Threat of Acne for Females

Female smokers may be much more likely to develop non-inflammatory acne (NIA) than women who don't smoke, says an Italian study in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Researchers looked at more than 1,000 women and found that 40 percent of those who smoked had NIA, compared with 10 percent of nonsmokers. Blocked pores, large white heads and small cysts are characteristic of NIA, BBC News reported.

The team at the San Gallicano Dermatological Institute in Rome said they conducted the study in women because the condition seems to be more prevalent in women than in men. Compared to nonsmokers, smokers in the study had half the levels of skin secretions of vitamin E and had other skin-related variations. The study also found that smokers who had acne in their teens were four times more likely to suffer NIA than nonsmokers who experienced teen acne.

The findings add to previous research that links smoking with acne, Colin Holden, president of the British Association of Dermatologists, told BBC News.

HealthDay News, September 18, 2007

Sep
19
2007

Skin Cooling After Laser Treatments Could Boost Hyperpigmentation Risk

Although it's meant to protect the skin, a cooling technique may actually boost the risk of hyperpigmentaion (discoloration) in dark-skinned patients after laser treatment for mole-like skin lesions, Thai researchers warn.

"It is not life-threatening, but postinflammatory hyperpigmentation may cause substantial psychological problems," wrote a team from Mahidol University in Bangkok. "The treatment of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is difficult and time-consuming, often lasting many months to achieve the desired results, which causes frustration in patients and physicians," they added.

Some experts have suggested that skin cooling -- which decreases pain and allows the use of higher laser frequencies -- may help reduce hyperpigmentation after laser treatment.

In this study, researchers used laser irradiation to treat 23 Thai women (average age 43) with Hori's nevus, blue-brown pigmented spots on the skin that develop later in life.

"One randomly selected face side of each patient was cooled using a cold air cooling device during and 30 seconds before and after laser irradiation, and the other side was irradiated without cooling," the researchers wrote.

Hyperpigmentation in the patients was assessed before treatment and one, two, three, four and 12 weeks after treatment.

Of the 21 patients who completed the study, 13 (62 percent) developed hyperpigmentation on the cooled side of the face, five (24 percent) developed the condition on the uncooled side, one patient (five percent) developed it on both sides of the face, and two (10 percent) did not have any hyperpigmentation.

The cooled sides were also three times more likely to develop hyperpigmentation than the uncooled sides, the authors said. Most cases developed two weeks after treatment. All but one of the cases were completely resolved 12 weeks after treatment.

The study was published in the September issue of the journal Archives of Dermatology.

HealthDay News, September 18, 2007