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Dec
18
2007

Skin Care: The Importance of Feel

By Steve Herman

In the excitement over peptides, neurocosmetics, antiglycation endpoints and prebiotics, it is easy to forget the importance of product look and feel.

Dec
18
2007

Study Finds Massage Relieves Pain After Surgery

U.S. researchers have found that patients treated with massage in postsurgical situations have experienced less pain.

Dec
17
2007

Minnesota Bans Mercury Added to Cosmetics, Skin Lighteners

The state of Minnesota has banned the intentional addition to mascara, eye liners and skin-lightening creams.

Dec
14
2007

Managing the Effect Stress Has on Skin

Stress can cause problems with skin, hair and nails. The American Academy of Dermatology has recommendations on how to curb those effects.

Dec
13
2007

Food Choices Can Have an Impact on Skin Health

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, "you are what you eat” is an adage that often applies to skin care...

Dec
12
2007

New Study Shows Possible Cause of Rosacea Bumps

Although they are normal inhabitants of human skin and cannot be seen, microscopic mites known as Demodex folliculorum may actually be something to blush about.

Dec
11
2007

Gene-based Sunscreen May Someday Prevent Skin Cancer

Research is shedding new light on sunscreens that might someday prevent or treat skin cancer by reversing dangerous gene mutations caused by overexposure to the sun.

Dec
07
2007

Topically Applied Caffeine Proves Successful as Slimming Agent

The Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology has published a report claiming that topically applied caffeine is a succesful slimming agent.

Dec
06
2007

FDA Eases Access to Acne Drug

Women seeking an acne medicine that can cause severe birth defects may find it a little easier to fill their prescription: The government announced some changes Wednesday designed to ease access to the troublesome drug.

A program called iPledge was designed to ensure that every user of Accutane or its generic competitors—and every doctor who prescribes it and every pharmacy that sells it—follows strict rules to make sure that women don't get pregnant while on the drug. Among those rules are month-by-month prescriptions based on passing pregnancy tests.

But last summer, the Food and Drug Administration heard evidence that iPledge hasn't ended the problem: There were 122 pregnancies in the program's first year and another 37 in the four months since. Another 19 pregnancies occurred in women who managed to get the drug despite never enrolling in iPledge.

Still, in October the FDA agreed to a few changes to the program, and announced Wednesday that iPledge is now implementing these changes:
* Women of childbearing age who don't fill a prescription within seven days of a pregnancy test will be allowed to get another test and then fill the prescription—with the exception of the initial prescription. Until now, those who didn't act within seven days were frozen out of the program for the next 23 days.
* Those women will have to fill the prescription within seven days of a pregnancy test rather than within seven days of first seeing their doctor.

Associated Press, December 5, 2007

Dec
05
2007

FDA Extends Comment Period for Proposed Sunscreen Rule

Extension to run through Dec. 26, 2007; agency seeks to balance industry concerns and the interests of public health to ensure that sunscreen products properly inform consumers of the level of protection...