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Dec
12
2007

New Study Shows Possible Cause of Rosacea Bumps

Although they are normal inhabitants of human skin and cannot be seen, microscopic mites known as Demodex folliculorum may actually be something to blush about.

Dec
11
2007

Gene-based Sunscreen May Someday Prevent Skin Cancer

Research is shedding new light on sunscreens that might someday prevent or treat skin cancer by reversing dangerous gene mutations caused by overexposure to the sun.

Dec
07
2007

Topically Applied Caffeine Proves Successful as Slimming Agent

The Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology has published a report claiming that topically applied caffeine is a succesful slimming agent.

Dec
06
2007

FDA Eases Access to Acne Drug

Women seeking an acne medicine that can cause severe birth defects may find it a little easier to fill their prescription: The government announced some changes Wednesday designed to ease access to the troublesome drug.

A program called iPledge was designed to ensure that every user of Accutane or its generic competitors—and every doctor who prescribes it and every pharmacy that sells it—follows strict rules to make sure that women don't get pregnant while on the drug. Among those rules are month-by-month prescriptions based on passing pregnancy tests.

But last summer, the Food and Drug Administration heard evidence that iPledge hasn't ended the problem: There were 122 pregnancies in the program's first year and another 37 in the four months since. Another 19 pregnancies occurred in women who managed to get the drug despite never enrolling in iPledge.

Still, in October the FDA agreed to a few changes to the program, and announced Wednesday that iPledge is now implementing these changes:
* Women of childbearing age who don't fill a prescription within seven days of a pregnancy test will be allowed to get another test and then fill the prescription—with the exception of the initial prescription. Until now, those who didn't act within seven days were frozen out of the program for the next 23 days.
* Those women will have to fill the prescription within seven days of a pregnancy test rather than within seven days of first seeing their doctor.

Associated Press, December 5, 2007

Dec
05
2007

FDA Extends Comment Period for Proposed Sunscreen Rule

Extension to run through Dec. 26, 2007; agency seeks to balance industry concerns and the interests of public health to ensure that sunscreen products properly inform consumers of the level of protection...

Dec
05
2007

2 in 1: Makeup Meets Skin Care

By Sara Mason

Makeup’s dynamic sales growth is, in part, a reflection of the demand for added benefits and natural ingredients, challenging formulators to continually work toward ever-more sophisticated products.

Dec
03
2007

Senators Join CSC in Requesting Lipstick Testing

Senators John Kerry, Diane Feinstein and Barbara Boxer have joined the interest group Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC) in questioning the levels of lead in lipstick.

Nov
28
2007

Face to Face Subject, Tracy Brennan, Shares Her Skin Care Secrets

By Abby Penning

Learn the methods this month’s Face to Face subject uses to overcome her skin difficulities.

Nov
20
2007

Color Cosmetics: A Comeback Story

By Briony Davies

Color cosmetics is forecast to keep pace with the overall cosmetics and toiletries market at a steady 3% per year through 2011. This resurgence in the segment is driven both by manufacturer innovation and consumers demanding better results from makeup.

Nov
20
2007

Low Glycemic Diet Can Help Decrease Acne

The findings from a new study suggest another reason why diets that contain low glycemic loads may be of benefit. Not only can they improve insulin sensitivity, this type of diet also appears to clear up acne as well.

Data from earlier studies suggest that dietary factors such as the glycemic load are involved in the pathogenesis of acne. Therefore, changes in diet could impact symptoms of this common skin disease, the researches hypothesize.

Foods that produce a high glycemic load—or high levels of blood glucose—such as white bread and potatoes tend to cause a rapid surge in blood sugar. Conversely, other carbs, such as high-fiber cereals or beans, create a more gradual change and are considered to have a low glycemic index.

Dr. Robyn N. Smith, from the RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues assessed acne symptoms in 43 male patients, between 15 and 25 years, who were randomly assigned to a low glycemic load diet or a normal diet for 12 weeks. The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% from low-glycemic-index carbohydrates.

The findings are published in the July issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The low-glycemic diet was associated with a significant reduce in total acne compared with the normal diet. In addition, the low-glycemic diet produced significantly greater reductions in body weight and body mass and a greater increase in insulin sensitivity. Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body’s cells become insensitive to the effects of insulin, so the body’s response to a normal amount of insulin is reduced. As a result, higher amounts of insulin are needed for this hormone to work in the body.
Smith and her associates point out that this study is the first randomized controlled trial to examine the influence the effects of glycemic load on acne.

“Although we could not isolate the effect of the low glycemic load diet from that of weight loss,” they add, the findings support the hypothesis of a relationship between acne and high insulin levels.

Reuters, July 20, 2007