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Regulations

New in Regulations (page 14 of 15)

Mar
07
2008

Changes on the Horizon in Natural Cosmetics Market

Organic Monitor is predicting 2008 to be defining year in the adoption of natural and organic standards in the skin care industry, possibly affecting a range of products and treatment options.

Feb
06
2008

PCPC Responds to Phthalates in Baby Care

The Personal Care Product Council (PCPC) has released a statement on phthalate exposure in baby care products.

Feb
05
2008

Natural, Smatural … What Does it Mean and Do We Want it Defined?

By Rachel Chapman

In the consumer’s world, natural means safer, greener, better for the environment, etc. And although this belief may not entirely be grounded in reality, the fact remains that products labeled as natural have been the force behind a major trend in cosmetics and personal care for years.

Jan
30
2008

The Green Report: The Question Begs the Answer

By Jeff Falk

Beauty industry bigwigs discuss the greening revolution.

Jan
16
2008

Cosmetics, Drugs and Labels

By Rick Van Arnam, Esq.

Failing to understand the distinction between the legal definition of cosmetics and drugs, and subsequent improper labeling or promotional claims, can be a costly error.

Jan
02
2008

Council Commends Congress for FDA Cosmetics Funding Increase

The Personal Care Products Council recently voiced its approval of Congress' plan to increase the funding for the review of cosmetics by the FDA.

Sep
19
2007

FDA Proposes New Rule for Sunscreen Products

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently proposed a new regulation that sets standards for formulating, testing and labeling over-the-counter (OTC) sunscreen drug products with ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) protection.

Because sunlight is composed of both UVA and UVB rays, the organization proposes the creation of a consumer-friendly rating system for UVA products designed to help consumers identify the level of UVA protection offered by a product, instead of only the level of UVB protection identified through SPF values.

The proposed four-star ratings system works with one star representing low UVA protection, two stars, medium; three stars, high; and four stars the highest UVA protection available in an OTC sunscreen product. If it doesn't provide at least a one-star protection rating, the FDA is proposing to require the product to bear a "no UVA protection" marking on the front label near the SPF value.

These ratings would be derived from two tests to assess the UVA deflection effectiveness. The first measures a product's ability to reduce the amount of UVA radiation that passes through it. The second measures its ability to prevent tanning.

Also, a "Warnings" statement in the Drug Facts box will be required from all sunscreen manufacturers that will say: "UV exposure from the sun increases the risk of skin cancer, premature skin aging and other skin damage. It is important to decrease UV exposure by limiting time in the sun, wearing protective clothing and using sunscreen."

When finalized, the regulation would amend the existing OTC sunscreen rule published in 1999. It will also revise the existing SPF (UVB) testing procedures, allow new combinations of active ingredients and ask for comments of the issue of nanoparticles.

Comments of the new rule will be accepted until November 26, 2007. These must be identified with Docket No. 1978N-0038 and can be submitted electronically or in written form.

Division of Dockets Management
Food and Drug Administration
5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061
Rockville, MD 20852
Fax: 301-827-6870

Electronic submissions can be made at: www.regulations.gov or www.fda.gov/dockets/ecomments.

May
04
2007

Take Action Against Career-threatening FDA Proposed Regulation

The Day Spa Association issued a release to its members urging them to take action against a new career-threatening regulation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently rewritten their regulations in an attempt to outlaw and eliminate alternative health care modalities. From massage to vitamins, minerals, and herbs, all alternative and complementary modalities will be labeled as practicing medicine without a license unless prescribed by a physician.

The subtle change of vocabulary from "alternative health care" to "alternative medicine" makes all of these industries subject to control by the FDA as medicine. Only medical doctors would be allowed to provide, prescribe and supervise the delivery of these services. Anybody else who provided any of these services would be practicing medicine without a license, and subject to incarceration and fines.

Click here to read the actual draft guidance.

What this means

1. By using the term "medicine" rather than "modality," for CAM practices, the FDA sets the stage so that anyone who is not a licensed physician is breaking the law by using these modalities since they are therefore "practicing medicine without a license."
 
2. By using the word "treatment," rather than "therapy," the FDA limits those who can perform these practices to licensed physicians.
 
3. By using the terms "medicine" and "treatment," instead of "modalities" and "therapy," all substances including vitamins, mineral herbs, co-factors, etc., automatically become untested drugs since they are being used to prevent, treat, mitigate, or cure disease states. Such use can only legally take place with FDA  with FDA approved drugs.
What you can do
Write to the FDA directly.
Write individual letters, call your congressman's office, or send an e-mail.
Raise awareness among your colleagues and encourage them to take action, as well.

Nov
15
2006

Humira Gets Expanded Approval for Psoriatic Arthritis

The Abbott Laboratories drug Humira (adalimumab) has been given expanded approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to slow structural joint damage in people with psoriatic arthritis. The condition affects people who have skin psoriasis.

Humira was initially approved for overall treatment of psoriatic arthritis in October 2005. It's also been sanctioned to treat moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis, and an inflammatory disease of the spine called ankylosing spondylitis.

Psoriatic arthritis combines symptoms of arthritis—including joint pain and inflammation—with those of psoriasis, including painful red lesions on the skin. Clinical testing on 313 people who hadn't responded to NSAID therapy found that people given Humira had significantly less joint damage than study participants who took a non-medicinal placebo, Abbott said in a statement.

People who took Humira also demonstrated increased ability to perform daily functions such as getting dressed, walking, and climbing stairs, the company said.

HealthDay News, November 14, 2006

Sep
20
2006

CTFA Files Comments With FDA on the Use of Nanotechnology in Personal Care Products

The Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association (CTFA) announced today that it has filed comprehensive comments with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the science and regulation of nanoparticles in personal care products.  CTFA comments, which can be found at www.ctfa.org, specifically address issues raised in a petition filed with the FDA earlier this year on the use of nanotechnology in personal care products, in particular, sunscreen products.
 
“Nanoparticles in sunscreens are very small particles that have been reviewed and approved by FDA.  They have been used safely and effectively by consumers for decades to protect from harmful UV rays and to prevent skin cancer,” said John Bailey, executive vice president for science at CTFA and former FDA official.  “These ingredients have properties that provide a greater degree of protection from the sun, are transparent when applied and aesthetically pleasing, and therefore encourage greater consumer acceptance.”
 
The nanoparticles in sunscreens, titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, are established, efficacious sunscreen filters that have been on the market for decades. In 1996, FDA concluded that smaller, micronized particles of titanium dioxide are not new substances and that there is no evidence demonstrating that these micronized particles are unsafe.  Nano-sized titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, unlike the larger particle size ingredient, form a transparent rather than a thick, white coating, which leads to greater consumer acceptance and use of sunscreen products, and therefore greater protection from skin cancer and other damaging effects of the sun.  The same improvement in formulation esthetics also applies to the use of these materials in cosmetics.
 
“Nanoparticle ingredients in personal care products sit on top of the skin, are used in small amounts, and are not absorbed into the body.  The general scientific consensus is that there is no risk to human health.  But we don’t rest on this knowledge alone,” Bailey said.  “We take the science of safety very seriously, and that is why we review the latest and most comprehensive scientific research, including nanotech research, before bringing a product to market.”
         
According to widely accepted independent research studies, the size of these nanoparticles does not make them inherently different in terms of toxicity or impact on human health than larger particles. It is also important to note that humans have long been exposed to some types of nanoparticles in the atmosphere such as smoke from candles, fireplaces and other sources. 
 
In the case of the sunscreen ingredients zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, the overwhelming weight of the scientific evidence states that these substances are safe and non-toxic, including when used in cosmetics and sunscreens.  
 
 
Authoritative bodies that have thoroughly reviewed titanium dioxide and zinc oxide include:
 
-          The FDA:  
Concluded that these substances are safe for use in cosmetics.  Titanium dioxide has been approved for use as a color additive in food, drugs, cosmetics, and contact lenses.  Zinc oxide is approved for use as a food ingredient, a color additive in drugs and cosmetics, and as a protectant for injured skin.
 
Concluded that these substances are safe for use in OTC drug products, including sunscreens, skin protectants, and other products.
 
-          The Scientific Committee for Cosmetic Products in the European Union:
Considered more than 100 titanium dioxide safety studies and concluded that these substances are safe for use in cosmetics.
 
-          Germany BfR, Federal Agency for Risk Assessment: 
In 2006, reviewed these two substances and found that the nanoparticles did not penetrate the skin, and that the biological properties of the nanoparticles were not necessarily different from those of larger particles.
 
-          The Australian government Department of Health and Aging:  
In 2006, published a comprehensive review of the science on zinc oxide and titanium dioxide and found no evidence that sunscreens containing these materials in nanoparticle form pose any risk. 
         
“The FDA has broad authority to ensure that personal care products and ingredients utilizing nanotechnology are safe for consumers and has consistently exercised that authority,” CTFA’s Bailey added.  “Sunscreens, some of which utilize sun-protecting nanoparticles, are required to go through an extensive pre-market review process to prove they are safe and effective.”
 
The FDA comprehensively regulates the safety of consumer health products.  Under the Federal, Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), FDA has erected a complex and comprehensive regulatory system to safeguard the public health.  This regulatory system has worked to ensure that, among other things, the food eaten by US consumers, the medical technology used by physicians and patients, and the personal care products used by countless citizens are among the safest in the world.
         
Based in Washington, D.C., CTFA is the trade association representing the cosmetic, toiletry, and fragrance industry in the United States and globally. Founded in 1894, CTFA has a membership of approximately 600 companies including manufacturers, distributors, and suppliers of the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the United States.