Sign in

Effective Events—Profitable Engagement

Contact Author Jorinda Nardone January 2015 issue of Skin Inc. magazine
Close

Thank you for your inquiry. Please note that the author cannot provide individual medical advice. Also, if you have a customer service question, email customer service at customerservice@skininc.com

Fill out my online form.
Effective Events—Profitable Engagement

Get the Skinny! This is just part of the article. Want the complete story, plus a host of other cutting-edge articles to make your job easier? Login or sign up!

Hosting events can be an amazing tool to showcase new and existing products or services, give back to clients and attract new business. Not only are events a great way to market a business in the community, they also bring an immediate increase in revenue. Utilize the following tools to create memorable and profitable events at your skin care facility.

Timing

It’s not just the time that the event will occur that is important, but also whether the facility is close to your to existing clients. Consider the availability of your clients—work, school, church, hobbies—as well as what is happening in the community when planning your event. Check school schedules and community events that may pull your clientele.

Timeliness of events also includes the frequency of hosting. Events are meant to seem special, so they draw additional interest and new clientele. For greatest efficacy, plan no more than three to four events per year. When you plan a monthly event, attendees will be the same repeat guests—who don’t usually spend additional funds—and it won’t have the energy and momentum a less frequent engagement does.

Flow

Want the rest of the story? Simply sign up. It’s easy. Plus, it only takes 1 minute and it’s free!

The flow of your event—where people are drawn to and where they end up congregating—can be hugely profitable. There needs to be a draw, actually a few, to really keep people engaged. Map out existing space and play with where vendors, displays or demonstrations will be to compel people to move through your venue. Keep demos short and sweet, and offer a variety of demos, vendors and self-discovery stations. Leave guests wanting more, but still with an understanding of why they may want that product or service.

If given a place to sit with food, know that you are going to lose some guests to just that. They will use this event as a chance to catch up with friends and not necessarily see all you have to offer. Spread out small offerings of food and drinks, or better yet, have someone circulate with the food to keep precious display space free, and facilitate an increase of energy and movement.

Execution

Planning can make or break the event. Ensure that current clients know about the event by sending invites out a month ahead. Alert the local news media, chambers and city groups, in addition to your own marketing via e-mail, social media and within your facility.

Don’t forget to ask for RSVPs. Use this as a chance to build your database by allowing clients to bring guests and, thus, collecting their consented marketing information. A few days prior to your event, e-blast a reminder saying it’s not too late to RSVP if you haven’t done so already. Although you can’t plan on everyone coming, at least you can have an idea of how many plan to attend.

Remember, some people will always be early. Plan on several people arriving up to 20 minutes prior to your event by having a sign-in sheet, raffle entries and a discovery station ready for a product demo while you get the last-minute preparations finalized.

No matter what, remember that this is a fun time and just go with the flow. Ask your team members for ideas. Play light, fun music to keep people upbeat and moving around.

With these steps in mind, some good planning and a healthy dose of flexibility, you can host successful events that increase your revenue and client base while gaining additional exposure for your business.

Jorinda+NardoneJorinda Nardone is the director of spa operations at Green Valley Ranch Resort, a four-Diamond Resort Destination in Las Vegas. Her goal is to change the face of spa sales and marketing, while increasing revenue potential and offering exceptional customer service.

 

Related Content