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More than 16 Million Americans Vulnerable to the Negative Social Impacts of Rosacea

Posted: April 8, 2013
Rosacea

For many individuals with rosacea, every social occasion can feel like a minefield no matter how mild their condition, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). April has been designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the NRS to alert the public to the early warning signs of this chronic and conspicuous facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

“Rosacea’s impact on appearance can be a disabling blow to the emotional and social lives of those who suffer from this poorly understood condition,” said Dr. Mark Dahl, chairman of the NRS Medical Advisory Board. “In addition, the stress of facing friends, family and co-workers can act as a trigger for flare-ups, leading to a tailspin that can become increasingly difficult to bear.”

Fortunately, for individuals who recognize rosacea’s warning signs and seek medical help, diagnosis and appropriate therapy can bring their signs and symptoms under control and keep its social and emotional effects at bay.

According to the new NRS survey of 801 rosacea patients, most feel the negative social impact of their condition regardless of which rosacea subtype they may have.

While 61% of those with only subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea, characterized by facial redness, said their rosacea had inhibited their social lives, the number rose to 72% among those who reported their redness was moderate or severe. Seventy-seven percent of patients with the bumps and pimples of subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea alone noted that their social life had been negatively impacted, and 85% of patients whose symptoms included subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea, involving thickening of the skin, had been negatively affected.