Skin Inc

Physiology Sponsored by

Email This Item!
Increase Text Size

Older Men Need a Hand in Inspecting for Possible Melanomas

Posted: April 24, 2009

Close inspections of the back and other hard to see places are vital in finding early-stage melanomas in older men, according to new research.

A new study delivers a lifesaving message to older men about the potentially deadly skin cancer known as melanoma: If you can't examine your own back, have a loved one take a look, and if there's something suspicious, see a doctor.

"We were trying to understand why it is that when a doctor finds a melanoma, it usually is thinner compared to a person finding it by himself," said Alan C. Geller, a senior research scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health, and a co-author of one of two reports on melanoma in older men that appears in the April issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Detecting a melanoma early, while it is thin, is an essential first step in surviving the skin cancer, said Dr. June K. Robinson, editor of the journal and a professor of clinical dermatology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who wrote an accompanying editorial. "The numbers are startling," she said. "If it is diagnosed at an early stage, the chance of survival is 90%. At a later stage, it is 20%."

There will be more than 62,000 cases of melanoma diagnosed in the United States this year, the U.S. National Cancer Institute estimates, and 8,420 Americans will die of the cancer. Half of those deaths will be in white men over the age of 50.