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Ingredients

New in Ingredients (page 43 of 43)

Aug
30
2006

Combating Cultural Stress

By Howard Murad, MD

Find out how spa professionals can combat cultural stress in today's society.

Aug
30
2006

Improper Use of Sunscreens Can Harm Skin

Unless it's continuously reapplied, sunscreen can actually attack the skin and leave it vulnerable to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, concludes a University of California, Riverside study.

The researchers found that, over time, molecules in sunscreen that block UV radiation can penetrate into the skin and leave the outer layer susceptible to UV, CBC News reported.

The study appears in an upcoming issue of the journal Free Radical Biology & Medicine.

"Sunscreens do an excellent job protecting against sunburn when used correctly," Kerry Hanson, a research scientist in the university's department of chemistry, said in a prepared statement.

"This means using a sunscreen with a high sun protection factor and applying it uniformly on the skin. Our data show, however, that if coverage at the skin surface is low, the UV filters in sunscreens that have penetrated into the epidermis can potentially do more harm than good," he said.

HealthNews Day, 8/29/06

Jul
25
2006

UVA-blocking Sunscreen Approved by FDA

Anthelios SX, a sunscreen that's reportedly better at blocking ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation than other sunscreens currently sold in the United States, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The product, made by the French cosmetics company L'Oreal SA, contains an ingredient called ecamsule, and has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15, the Associated Press reported.

Ecamsule is more effective against UVA radiation than ingredients (which block mainly ultraviolet B radiation) contained in sunscreens currently sold in the United States. Ecamsule has been an ingredient in L'Oreal's sunscreens sold in Europe and Canada since 1993.

The FDA noted that UVA is a deeper penetrating radiation than UVB. There's a suspected link between UVA and long-term effects such as wrinkles, basal and squamous cell cancers and melanoma, the AP reported.

Jul
14
2006

Natural Cosmetics Booming in France

Natural cosmetic sales are booming in France, increasing 40% in 2005, according to Organic Monitor, a business research and consulting company. Due to growing awareness of chemicals in products, consumers are shying away from traditional staples and opting for natural toiletries, makeup and hair care. A new study by Organic Monitor shows that sales are continuing to rise in 2006. In addition, with more than 1,700 choices on the market, organic products account for about one-fourth of all natural cosmetic sales.

Jul
07
2006

Spa-Goers Focus on Cosmeceutical Treatments

According to “Cosmeceuticals in the U.S.,” a new report from market research publisher Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, American spa-goers have turned their attention from injectables to cosmeceutical treatments. Sales of products such as anti-wrinkle creams and home facial peel kits jumped 7% last year to more than $13.3 billion. Projections estimate that the cosmeceuticals market will surpass $17 billion in 2010, growing a total of 29.4% between 2005 and 2010.

May
09
2006

CE.R.I.E.S. Gives Research Award

Centre de Recherches et d’Investigations Épidermiques et Sensorielles (CE.R.I.E.S.) announces its CE.R.I.E.S. 2006 Research Award—created to honor a researcher in dermatology and help fund future research projects focused on healthy skin. This year, Masayuki Amagai, MD, PhD, of Tokyo, received this coveted award totaling $52,000. +33 (0) 1 46 43 49 00

Apr
27
2006

The Iron Age

By Ada S. Polla

Discover how to reduce the effect of iron on aging skin.

Apr
03
2006

Sunscreen Makers Sued for False Claims

A class action lawsuit launched in Los Angeles against the five leading U.S. makers of sun protection lotions alleges that the companies lied about the effectiveness of their products in blocking harmful sun rays and protecting skin.

The lawsuit names the following brands: Coppertone (Schering-Plough); Banana Boat (Sun Pharmaceuticals and Playtex Products); Hawaiian Tropic (Tanning Research Laboratories); Neutrogena (Neutrogena Corp. and Johnson & Johnson); and Bullfrog (Chattem Inc.).

Combined, they account for 70 percent of U.S. sales of such products, Agence France Presse reported.

Mitchell Twersky, one of the lawyers involved in the legal action, said claims by these brands are "clearly misleading" insofar as they claim that "their products block all the harmful sun rays."

The lawsuit seeks to have words such as "sunblock" and "waterproof" taken off the labels of these products. It also wants the companies that make them to direct "the money that they wrongfully obtained" into a skin cancer research foundation, AFP reported.

HealthDay News, March 31, 2006

Mar
28
2006

The Esthetic Benefits of Oxygen Skin Care

By: Craig Wenborg, MD

Learn about this new trend in skin care treatments.

Feb
02
2006

The New Skin of Color

By Christine Heathman

The future of skin care is a rainbow of colors that offers new insights and challenges for skin care professionals.