Most Popular in:

Ingredients

New in Ingredients (page 41 of 43)

May
23
2007

Anti-aging: Beyond Wrinkles

By Tracy Sherwood

Wrinkle reducers aren’t the only thing consumers are looking for in skin care products anymore.

May
04
2007

Take Action Against Career-threatening FDA Proposed Regulation

The Day Spa Association issued a release to its members urging them to take action against a new career-threatening regulation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently rewritten their regulations in an attempt to outlaw and eliminate alternative health care modalities. From massage to vitamins, minerals, and herbs, all alternative and complementary modalities will be labeled as practicing medicine without a license unless prescribed by a physician.

The subtle change of vocabulary from "alternative health care" to "alternative medicine" makes all of these industries subject to control by the FDA as medicine. Only medical doctors would be allowed to provide, prescribe and supervise the delivery of these services. Anybody else who provided any of these services would be practicing medicine without a license, and subject to incarceration and fines.

Click here to read the actual draft guidance.

What this means

1. By using the term "medicine" rather than "modality," for CAM practices, the FDA sets the stage so that anyone who is not a licensed physician is breaking the law by using these modalities since they are therefore "practicing medicine without a license."
 
2. By using the word "treatment," rather than "therapy," the FDA limits those who can perform these practices to licensed physicians.
 
3. By using the terms "medicine" and "treatment," instead of "modalities" and "therapy," all substances including vitamins, mineral herbs, co-factors, etc., automatically become untested drugs since they are being used to prevent, treat, mitigate, or cure disease states. Such use can only legally take place with FDA  with FDA approved drugs.
What you can do
Write to the FDA directly.
Write individual letters, call your congressman's office, or send an e-mail.
Raise awareness among your colleagues and encourage them to take action, as well.

Mar
23
2007

The Truth About Chemicals, Mineral Oil, Squalene and Fillers

By Rebecca Jame Gadberry

This guru sheds light on common misunderstanding regarding these ingredients.

Mar
21
2007

Sunscreen Technology, Regulations and Formulations

By Ken Klein

Learn about the state of sunscreens in the United States today and how a better understanding of them can lead to enhanced customer service for your clients.

Mar
02
2007

The Amazing Avocado

By Cathy Christensen

This jade-colored treat is packed with vitamins, flavor and moisturizing benefits.

Jan
31
2007

International Trends: Redefining Indigenous

By Richard Williams

Embrace the culture of your country and provide a unique experience for your clients.

Jan
31
2007
Jan
16
2007

Growth Hormones Not Fountain of Youth

Older Americans taking shots of human growth hormone in an effort to turn back the clock will likely be disappointed.

As an anti-aging treatment, the hormones appear to offer few benefits but significant health risks, a review of the research finds.

Stanford University researchers came to this conclusion after analyzing 31 studies that included a total of more than 500 relatively healthy elderly people.

The only clearly positive effect found from taking the hormones was a slight improvement in lean body mass.

On the negative side, participants who took human growth hormones were significantly more likely to develop joint swelling and pain, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

There was also a suggestion of an increased risk of diabetes and prediabetes, but that association did not reach statistical significance.

Authors of the review say better studies are needed to understand the risks and benefits of human growth hormone as an anti-aging treatment.

But they say studies do not support the use of human growth hormones for this reason.

"If the benefits truly are minimal, and the risks are not, this is not a therapy that should be used for anti-aging purposes," Hau Liu, MD, MBA, MPH tells WebMD.

Use Growing Among Elderly

Growth hormone is naturally produced in the pituitary gland at the base of the brain, but its levels decline with age.

Promoters of synthetic growth hormone as an anti-aging treatment claim the hormones can do everything from firm sagging skin to boost a sagging libido.

According to government figures, between 25,000 and 30,000 Americans used growth hormones for aging purposes in 2004. That is a tenfold increase in about a decade, Thomas T. Perls, MD, tells WebMD.

Costly Treatment

"The cost of this treatment can be $12,000 a year or more, but even if you take the cost out of the equation, there is still a huge potential for causing harm," Perls says. "The people promoting this stuff have absolutely no idea what the long-term health effects are."

Because human growth hormone has not been approved for use as an anti-aging treatment by federal regulators, Perls argues that doctors who prescribe it for this purpose are breaking the law.

He first made that charge in a report published in The Journal of the American Medical Association in late 2005.

Perls' report prompted Liu and colleagues to conduct their review of the research on human growth hormone as an antiaging treatment.

No Fountain of Youth

The researchers limited their review to randomized, controlled clinical trials that included relatively healthy elderly people.

The participants used growth hormone for an average of about six months.

While growth hormone did appear to increase lean muscle mass and reduce body fat by an average of just over 4 pounds, it did not appear to have an effect on other measures of fitness, including bone density, cholesterol and lipid levels.

"From our review, there's not data to suggest that growth hormone prolongs life, and none of the studies make that claim," Liu says.

Liu tells WebMD he was surprised to find so little research has been done on the use of growth hormones in the elderly population—especially since so many claims have been made about the treatment's benefits.

But he says he understands why people believe the hype.

"Elderly people today are very health conscious and they are trying to do all they can to take care of themselves," Liu says. "But our conclusion is that growth hormone does not represent a magic bullet or the fountain of youth."

By Salynn Boyles, WebMD Medical News, January 16, 2007

Dec
29
2006

Cosmetic Wrinkle Filler Approved

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new treatment for moderate-to-severe frown lines, medically called nasolabial folds.

BioForm Medical issued a statement describing its Radiesse as a longer-lasting alternative to existing wrinkle fillers. The company said its calcium-based microsphere technology not only fills in facial folds and depressions, but also stimulates the body to produce collagen, the fibrous protein that gives the face its structure and fullness.

The drug was also newly approved to improve the appearance of people with AIDS-causing HIV who have significant facial fat loss (lipoatrophy), the San Mateo, Calif.-based company said.

Radiesse was first FDA approved in 2002 for use in facial reconstructive surgery.

HealthDay News, December 28, 2006

Dec
08
2006

Tea Extracts Repair Radiotherapy Skin Damage

Findings from a new study confirm that tea extracts applied to the skin promote the repair of damage from radiotherapy, and shed light on the mechanisms involved in the injury...